Yara launches liquid fertilizer plant in South Africa
In an opening ceremony hosted by Yara Cape in Malmesbury, Yara launched a $2.3 million liquid fertilizer plant.
 
Malmesbury is a town of close to 40,000 inhabitants, located in the south-west of South Africa approximately 65km north of Cape Town. The town belongs to the Western Cape Region, the heartland of South African farming. A key contributor to the country’s GDP, the region produces 55%-60% of South Africa’s agricultural exports. Key products cultivated here include wine, wheat and cereals as well as fruits and vegetables.
 
The Malmesbury facility enables Yara to serve farmers in a radius of more than 300km from the plant in several markets including dryland cereals, vegetables, fruit and grapes.
 
“With this latest investment we affirm our belief in the agricultural potential of South Africa and our aspiration to be the leading crop nutrition company in the country, with the farmer at the center of everything we do,” said Terje Knutsen, Executive Vice President, Yara Crop Nutrition. 
 
Liquid fertilizers have numerous benefits including even and accurate application and optimization of resources such as labor and equipment. Yara offers a well-balanced and crop specific product portfolio to customers, tailored to soil and crop needs.
 
In a presentation, Manager: Agronomic services and Research Yara Cape, Pieter Brink, said: “Climate change is having a big impact globally with effects being felt in South Africa in the form of droughts and changing weather patterns. In the Western Cape we are feeling the pressure with considerable stress on water resources. Resource use efficiency can be enhanced by the use of Liquid Fertilizer, in both irrigated and dryland crop production.”
 
Ig Ferreira, General Manager of Yara Cape added: “We are grateful and proud to announce the completion of this construction without injuries. Safety is our license to operate. With the increased capacity of this investment, we once again illustrate our commitment to the Western and Southern Cape farmers and their needs.”